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Fri, 25 May 2007 05:04:08 GMT

Be a Part of Our Anti-smoking Campaign

Be a Part of Our Anti-smoking Campaign
This is an impressive ambient anti-smoking advertisement campaign launched Al Sawy Cultural Centre to create awareness in this direction in Egypt. The campaign has used doormat having printed heart on them which was sent to various people in Cairo and decision was left on them to convert into ambient campaign. That was actually a smart move to make the campaign real effective. The strategy was that when people will start footing the heart while treading the mat the printed heart will start getting dirty thereby reminding the problem of smoking.

The advertisement was indeed innovative to reach out to the larger mass in an effective way. In addition, the unique presentation of the idea might have surely attracted people’s attention and this has the capability to be talked about among people. The punch line of the campaign says, ‘Be a part of our anti-smoking campaign’. The campaign was dJWT, Cairo, Egypt.

Via: I Believe in Adv

Posted by: Balendu      Read more     Source


May 23, 2007, 8:31 PM CT

Skin Reactions To New Class Of Cancer Drugs

Skin Reactions To New Class Of Cancer Drugs
Image courtesy of managecrc.com
Skin reactions to a powerful new class of anti-cancer drugs are frequent, but manageable through a simple and rational therapy approach commonly without the need to reduce the dose or interrupt therapy with potentially life-prolonging chemotherapy, as per an article in the recent issue of "The Oncologist".

The special article presents the first recommendations on skin reactions to the new drugs, called Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitors (EGFRIs). The guidelines were developed at an international multidisciplinary meeting, including medical oncologists, dermatologists, nurses, and pharmacists. "One important goal is to ensure that healthcare professionals and patients see EGFRI-associated dermatologic toxicity as manageable, thereby optimizing clinical benefit from continued and uninterrupted use of EGFRIs when possible," as per lead author Dr. Thomas J. Lynch, Jr., of Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston.

Treatment with EGFRIs has been shown to improve survival in patients with several types of cancer, including lung, pancreatic, and colorectal cancers. The drugs including erlotinib (Tarceva), cetuximab (Erbitux), and panitumumab (Vectibix) work by interfering with cell-signaling abnormalities that contribute to cancer development and growth.........

Posted by: Andria      Read more         Source


May 23, 2007, 8:18 PM CT

Tiny genes may increase cancer susceptibility

Tiny genes may increase cancer susceptibility
New evidence indicates that small pieces of noncoding genetic material known as microRNAs (miRNAs) might influence cancer susceptibility. Differences in certain miRNAs may predispose some individuals to develop cancer, say scientists collaborating in a joint study at the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson in Philadelphia, Ohio State University Medical Center in Columbus and Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo.

MiRNAs play many roles in biological regulation, including development and cell differentiation, helping to determine what type a cell ultimately becomes. But when damaged, they can contribute to cancer by either turning on cancer-causing genes or by inhibiting tumor-blocking genes. The ways that MiRNAs are expressed have been used to profile tumor types in humans.

To see if miRNAs could affect cancer risk, Linda Siracusa, Ph.D., associate professor of microbiology and immunology at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, research associate Cinzia Sevignani, Ph.D., and co-workers George Calin, M.D., Ph.D., and Carlo M. Croce, M.D., at Ohio State University in Columbus and Peter Demant, M.D., Ph.D., at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo compared the mouse chromosome locations of genes known to affect cancer susceptibility or "susceptibility loci" in eight different types of tumors to the locations of mouse miRNAs.........

Posted by: Andria      Read more         Source


May 21, 2007, 12:31 AM CT

Decoding gene expression in cancer tumors

Decoding gene expression in cancer tumors
By correlating images of malignant liver tissue with gene expression patterns, a research team led by a radiologist at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine has developed tools that may some day allow physicians to view a CT image of a cancer tumor and discern its genetic activity. The study, designed to help doctors obtain the molecular details of a specific tumor or disease without having to do an invasive biopsy procedure, will be published online on May 21 in Nature Biotechnology.

As per principle investigator Michael Kuo, M.D., assistant professor of interventional radiology at UCSD, the study represents the convergence of two developing fields of medical research: the mapping of the human genome and advances in diagnostic imaging.

The research team, which included researchers from Stanford University School of Medicine, systematically compared features from CT images of liver tumors with gene expression patterns obtained from surgery and tissue biopsies. Once they pinpointed the genomic correlates of the features detected by CT imaging, the scientists observed that the two very different aspects of studying cancer how the tumor looks in a Computerized axial tomography scan and how it behaves on a molecular level had a very strong connection.........

Posted by: Andria      Read more         Source


May 21, 2007, 12:25 AM CT

New research supports early testing for prostate cancer

New research supports early testing for prostate cancer
Prostate cancer is the third-leading cause of cancer deaths among American men and is most treatable when caught in its earliest stages. Research presented today during the 102nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association in Anaheim, Ca. provided further evidence supporting regular prostate-cancer screening and offered new insights into disease progression and the hormonal therapy of recurrent disease. A special session for media highlighting this research was held on May 20 at 9:00 a.m. PDT and was moderated by AUA spokesman Christopher L. Amling, M.D.


A SINGLE PSA MEASUREMENT IN MIDDLE AGE PREDICTS DIAGNOSIS OF ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER UP TO 25 YEARS LATER IN AN UNSCREENED POPULATION (Abstract 1876)

Almost all advanced cancers could be found early by intense screening of at-risk patients, as per scientists from New York and Malmo, Sweden who analyzed samples taken from a population-based cohort of 21,277 men in Malmo, Sweden between 1974 and 1986 to determine whether initial PSA plasma levels correlated with future diagnosis of advanced disease.

Of the 21,277 cases, 498 men actually developed prostate cancer, and 161 suffered from advanced disease (greater than T3 or metastasis). Association between PSA levels and eventual development advanced disease was determined using conditional logistical regression. In men with a total PSA of.5,.75, 1., 1.5 and 2 ng/ml, the probability of being diagnosed with advanced disease by age 75 was 2 percent, 3 percent, 4 percent, 7 percent and 12 percent, respectively. Risk was highly concentrated, with 89 percent of advanced cancers occuring in men with the top 10 percent of PSA levels.........

Posted by: Andria      Read more         Source


May 17, 2007, 5:23 AM CT

Hair relaxers do not increase risk

Hair relaxers do not increase risk
Image courtesy of hair.lovetoknow.com
As per scientists at Boston Universitys Slone Epidemiology Center, hair relaxers are not linked to increased risk of breast cancer in black women. The findings would be reported in the recent issue of Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention.

Hair dye use has been linked to an increased risk of various cancers in some studies, but these results have generally not been confirmed. The present study is the first to assess hair relaxers in relation to a cancer.

Since millions of women have used hair relaxers, and because the carcinogenic potential of hair relaxers is unknown, Lynn Rosenberg, ScD, associate director of Boston Universitys Slone Epidemiology Center, and his colleagues examined the association of hair relaxer use with breast cancer incidence in the Black Womens Health Study.

The Black Womens Health Study is a follow-up study of 59,000 African American women from across the United States conducted by researchers at Boston Universitys Slone Epidemiology Center and Howard University Cancer Center. While tracking data from 1997 to 2003, scientists painstakingly analyzed more than 266,000 person-years of follow up data to determine that there is no increase in breast cancer incidence linked to hair relaxer use.

"In the present study of African American women, increases in breast cancer risk were not linked to any categories of duration of hair relaxer use, frequency of use, age at first use, number of burns experienced during use, or type of relaxer used," stated Rosenberg. "Of particular interest, null associations were observed among younger women, who used relaxers at earlier ages and more frequently than older women. Thus, the findings provide empirical evidence that hair relaxers are not carcinogenic to the breast and do not contribute to the higher occurence rate of breast cancer in young African-American women than in young white women".........

Posted by: Andria      Read more         Source


May 15, 2007, 11:18 PM CT

Anti Cancer Properties Of Broccoli Spoiled By Boiling

Anti Cancer Properties Of Broccoli Spoiled By Boiling
Next time at lunch do not boil that broccoli. That's the message from latest research.

Scientists at the University of Warwick have observed that the standard British cooking habit of boiling vegetables severely damages the anticancer properties of a number of Brassica vegetables such as broccoli, Brussel sprouts, cauliflower and green cabbage.

Past studies have shown that consumption of Brassica vegetables decreases the risk of cancer. This is because of the high concentration in Brassicas of substances known as glucosinolates which are metabolized to cancer preventive substances known as isothiocyanates. However before this research it was not known how the glucosinolates and isothiocyanates were influenced by storage and cooking of Brassica vegetables.

The researchers, Prof Paul Thornalley from Warwick Medical School at the University of Warwick and Dr Lijiang Song from the University of Warwick's Department of Chemistry bought Brassica vegetables, (broccoli, Brussel sprouts, cauliflower and green cabbage) from a local store and transported them to the laboratory within 30 minutes of purchasing. The effect of cooking on the glucosinolate content of vegetables was then studied by investigating the effects of cooking by boiling, steaming, microwave cooking and stir-fry.........

Posted by: Andria      Read more         Source


May 13, 2007, 10:00 PM CT

Gene's Effect On Bone Loss In Breast Cancer Patients

Gene's Effect On Bone Loss In Breast Cancer Patients
Women with estrogen-responsive breast cancer are often prescribed a drug that reduces their estrogen levels. But because estrogen is important to bone health, there is widespread concern about how the estrogen-reducing drugs - called aromatase inhibitors - affect bones.

A study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis will investigate bone loss in women taking aromatase inhibitors, and scientists are calling for interested women to volunteer.

Aromatase is an enzyme that transforms testosterone and other androgens into estrogen. This process represents the major, if not only, source of estrogen in postmenopausal women. So giving women aromatase inhibitors can result in nearly complete shutdown of estrogen production, which can have unwanted side effects.

"There are reports of an increased occurence rate of fractures in women on aromatase inhibitors," says Reina Armamento-Villareal, M.D., assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Bone and Mineral Diseases and a Washington University bone specialist at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. "But interestingly, studies show that women respond differently to these drugs, possibly because of variations in the gene that produces the aromatase enzyme."

This gene is CYP19. Researchers have identified several variations of CYP19 that can result in either increased or decreased aromatase activity. This in turn influences how aromatase inhibitors affect estrogen levels. The Washington University study will analyze the sequence of the CYP19 gene in volunteers to see which variation they possess.........

Posted by: Andria      Read more         Source


May 10, 2007, 5:32 AM CT

Giving A Knockout Punch To Deadly Cancer

Giving A Knockout Punch To Deadly Cancer
New scientific evidence is helping to build a compelling case for oncolytic viruses as a first-line and adjunctive therapy for a number of cancers.

Reovirus, a non-pathogenic virus under development at Calgary, Alberta-based Oncolytics Biotech, has shown powerful anti-cancer activity against cultured tumor cells, in animal models, and in human clinical trials. Oncolytics' proprietary reovirus formulation, Reolysin, is active against numerous cancers, including intractable sarcomas and melanomas.

Recent studies also indicate that Reolysin works synergistically with standard anti-cancer drugs, providing significantly stronger responses than either agent alone.

In addition, other studies completed in the past year have shown Reolysin has the ability to prime patients' immune systems against their particular cancer, leading to additional cancer cell killing. It is through this second "inflammatory" mechanism that scientists hope Reolysin will bring about long-term remissions of once-untreatable cancers.

At the Fourth International Conference on Oncolytic Viruses as Cancer Therapeutics in March 2007 in Scottsdale, Arizona, several presentations focused on reovirus efficacy alone or in combination with standard chemotherapies.

In one study, researchers examined the tumor-killing ability of reovirus plus cisplatin, a standard chemotherapy agent, in a mouse melanoma model that included both cultured cells and live animals. The results of the preclinical study showed that the combination of reovirus and cisplatin was significantly more effective than cisplatin or reovirus alone at killing melanoma cancer cells in a mouse model. The researchers intend to explore the mechanism of this promising synergistic action in further detail in future preclinical work.........

Posted by: Andria      Read more         Source


May 7, 2007, 10:50 PM CT

Steep Cost For Health Care And Patients

Steep Cost For Health Care And Patients
The drug trastuzumab (Herceptin) is used to treat HER2-positive breast cancer (a type of breast cancer that overexpresses the HER2 gene and accounts for about 25% of all breast cancers). Trastuzumab treatment improves the chances of survival; however, it has deleterious side effects and is expensive. Thus, it is important to accurately determine the patients HER2 status. The challenge is to develop a testing strategy that is both accurate and economical. A false-negative test result can mean a woman will not receive a life-prolonging drug, and a false-positive result can lead to unnecessary, expensive drug therapy.

In this systematic review, Dendukuri and his colleagues compared the cost-effectiveness of 7 strategies (based on a combination of 2 tests) to diagnose HER2 status. They observed that the most cost-effective strategy is to screen all women who have newly diagnosed breast cancer with immunohistochemistry and to confirm ambiguous or positive test scores with fluorescence in situ hybridization.

In a related commentary, Brian Goldman notes that the example of trastuzumab and the HER2 gene illustrates both the promise and the perils of gene patenting. Even though genes occur naturally in humans, it is the person who discovers a gene who commonly holds the patent for it.........

Posted by: Andria      Read more         Source


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